Tag Archives: indication of interest

Crucial Questions to Ask Before Hiring a Business Broker

Selling a business is no small beans. It’s a process that requires careful planning years in advance. Diomo Corporation reports that, at any one time, there are 15 prospective buyers on the market for every one business listed for sale. While this statistic is favorable for sellers, 50% of all transactions agreed to between the buyer and seller fall apart during the due diligence stage and never close.

Having a trusted business broker in your corner could mean the difference between selling your business for a fair price and not selling it at all. When it comes to finding the right broker for your business, there are a handful of questions you must be asking.

What’s your experience selling businesses like mine? How many have you sold?
The operational ins and outs of the restaurant business are vastly different from the ins and outs of an insurance company. For this reason, the sale of these two businesses will look very different and having a broker with the right experience is crucial. Don’t hesitate to ask your broker about their experience selling businesses within your industry including how many similar businesses they’ve sold.

Is business brokerage your full-time occupation?
It’s important that the broker you choose is dedicated to the sale of your business. Be wary of working with a broker who divides their time between a couple of different professions. Finding a buyer for a business and facilitating that transaction takes a tremendous amount of time and dedication. A broker working another job likely won’t be able to give your sale the attention it requires.

How many listings do you have right now?
If your business broker has a copious number of listings, they may be spread too thin. Conversely, if your broker has no listings, it could indicate a lack of motivation, possibly related to another source of income. A manageable number of listings for a full-time business broker is 3-7. Use this range as a benchmark for brokers you’re interviewing.

How many qualified buyers do you have?
When it comes to choosing the right broker for your business, it’s perfectly acceptable to ask each broker how many qualified buyers they have in their back pocket. You want to make sure brokers know their qualified buyers personally and aren’t just relying on a generic email list. Personal connections to qualified buyers and sellers are one of a broker’s biggest assets.

Do you help with contract preparation?
Structuring deals and drafting legal agreements are skills any experienced broker should possess. However, a good broker should also advise you to have your paperwork carefully examined by an attorney before details are finalized. Involving an attorney to review legal agreements helps reduce the liability for all involved parties.

The question isn’t: Is hiring a business broker a wise choice when it comes to selling my business? but how do I hire an experienced business broker who is motivated to represent my interests? Taking the time to interview potential brokers is a huge investment in the sale of your business.

Set Your Company Up for Success: What Top Business Leaders Do to Succeed

Success is the result of careful planning. Here are some important tips from top business leaders for growing a successful company:

Tip #1 – Be the tortoise, not the hare

Slow and steady growth is a much more sound approach than bursts of growth. Many companies scale too quickly and collapse because their infrastructure is unable to accommodate it. Get More Info to find the right infrastructure in your home.

Tip #2 – State your goals

This might sound obvious but its importance cannot be underestimated. Write down your company goals and delineate your plan for achieving them. Communicate these goals and strategies to your employees and revisit the conversation often, keeping everyone up to speed on where the company is at in the process of achieving them. This will remind your employees that their position fits into the bigger picture and it will motivate them to do their best work.

Tip #3 – Build trust through transparency

Being open about your company goals and strategies is one way to cultivate transparency within your organization. When transparency is a priority, you create an atmosphere of trust which leads to improved morale, increased connection and productivity and better employee retention – all keys to running a successful organization.

Tip #4 – Practice good financial reporting

Paying close attention to company financials is a must. The use of a financial dashboard gives you a visual sense of where your company stands in many areas and helps you better comprehend and interpret performance metrics. The up-to-date information allows you to set practical implementation strategies that keep the health of your company priority one.

Tip #5 – Focus on the big picture when hiring

Promoting internally motivates employees to work hard and produce quality work. When you interview candidates for entry-level positions, ask yourself if the candidates fit the company culture and if they possess the skills and drive necessary to take on greater roles within the company down the road. Hiring with the big picture in mind sets your organization up for both short-term and long-term success.

Want help with the purchase of your next business? You can reach us at 612.331.8392 or by email at info@oibmn.com.

Primary Components of an M&A Purchase Agreement

It’s important to familiarize yourself with the ins and outs of an M&A purchase agreement so you can go into your next transaction prepared.

Think of a purchase agreement as a more detailed LOI. While it contains the same terms as the LOI, it also includes additional terms and conditions and goes into greater depth.

Here are the primary components of an M&A purchase agreement:

Definitions: Before agreeing to the terms in a purchase agreement, it’s important to clarify the terms so everyone is on the same page. Many terms in a PA can seem ambiguous and up to individual interpretation. Taking the time to define these terms can clear up confusion upfront and is one more step towards ensuring a smooth transaction from start to finish.

Indemnifications: This part of the purchase agreement helps to protect the buyer from any issues that may arise after closing and draws a clear line of responsibility in the sand. Often heavily contested and litigated, indemnifications address which actions are covered, how long the indemnification period lasts, financial caps on damages, etc.

Representations, Warranties and Schedules: This is where the seller states what is true about the business at the time of sale. This can include up-to-date financial statements, any current environmental liabilities, ongoing litigation and employee benefits.

Execution Provisions: What money is being exchanged and in what forms? Are there any purchase price adjustments, escrows or earnouts? This is where all financial details relating to the purchase are spelled out.

Covenants: These are agreed upon behaviors between buyers and sellers. They can address the hiring of new employees as well as bonuses and raises instituted by the seller between the signing of the purchase agreement and the closing. They can also address post-closing behaviors such as non-compete agreements and D&O insurance.

Closing Conditions: This is the part of the purchase agreement where you detail requirements of both the buyer and the seller between the purchase agreement and the closing table. These requirements are specific to the transaction and can include special financing conditions, provisions stating that all representations and warranties are met, material adverse change clauses, etc.

If you want help creating a thorough M&A purchase agreement, we’d love to assist. We can be reached at 612.331.8392 or by email at info@oibmn.com.

What Not To Do When Submitting an Indication of Interest

When submitting an Indication of Interest, it’s important to put your best foot forward. Price range, financing details, a due diligence timeline, a proposed closing date…these are just a few items typically submitted with an IOI that assist in creating a solid case for business acquisition. Conversely, if you’re seriously considering an acquisition, there are also some things you must not do. 

Do not overlook the due diligence process

Instead, reach out to the banker with all of your questions. This demonstrates a high level of interest and responsibility – two important components of the business acquisition process. Communicating with the banker shows that you’re doing your homework and that you’re a serious contender for the purchase. 

Do not submit a weak offer

Instead, submit a well-calculated, competitive offer. If you’re trying to hone in on a ballpark offer, talking with the banker on the seller’s side can help. They can’t give you a number but they can inform you more about the seller’s situation and general market trends. 

Do not skimp on the details

Instead, write out your unique advantages in your offer letter. Similar to a letter a buyer encloses when they submit an offer on a private purchase, writing out your “selling points” can lead a seller to choose your offer over another competitive offer. Be sure to include information about your timeframe, financials and company culture. And the more information the better! This information can increase banker and seller confidence, reduce their uncertainty and minimize perceived risk.

Do you want help navigating the business acquisition process? We’d love to partner with you! Contact us at 612.331.8392 or by email at info@oibmn.com.